MSC Approved Tuna Fisheries


Certified Fisheries Fisheries In Full Assessment
Skipjack Skipjack
Albacore Albacore
Yellowfin Yellowfin

 


 

Certified Skipjack Fisheries

skipjack  

 

North Pacific – Japanese, Pole and Line, Skipjack and Albacore

Fishing area: Western Central Pacific (FAO Area 71)
Fishing method: Pole and line
Volume – Landings: 2730.1 (2015)

Link

 

PNA countries (Parties to the Nauru Agreement)

Fishing area: FAO 71, Western Central Pacific
Fishing method: Purse seiner unassociated/ non FAD free schools
Volume – Landings: By 2011 were 422.921 MT
Location: The fishery is located within the EEZ’s of the 8 PNA countries: Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Palau, Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Kiribati and Tuvalu

PNA

Fishing method:
This fishing method only target Skipjack adult school (free-schools/ unassociated).
A purse seiner circles the school with a deep curtain of netting, Then the bottom of the net is pursed (closed) underneath the fish school by hauling a wire running from the vessel through rings along the bottom of the net and then back to the vessel, preventing the fish from "sounding", or swimming down to escape the net.

Searching for the fish schools and assessing their size and direction of movement is an important part of the fishing operation. Sophisticated electronics, such as echo sounders, sonar, and track plotters, may be used to search for and track schools, assessing their size and movement and keeping in touch with the school while it is surrounded with the seine net.

Link

 

Maldives pole & line

Fishing area: FAO 51, Western Pacific
Fishing method: Pole and Line
Volume – Landings: By 2007 were 118.454, reported by the certifier
Location: The fishery is located in the Indian Ocean within the Maldives EEZ

FAO51

Fishing method:
The basic Pole & Line fishing technique remains unchanged; although fiberglass poles have replaced bamboo ones and “Japanese” hooks are used.
Fish for use as live bait are caught within the atolls using a simple lift net.

Formerly, the baitfish was caught first thing in the morning before proceeding offshore in search of tuna. Nowadays bait is harvested at night using lights, with fish caught at the surface in a water depth of 35 m to 40 m as opposed to harvesting species that habited the coral.
The bait is transferred from the lift net to a holding tank on the masdhoni (fishing vessel), which when empty can be used to store SKJ.

To catch SKJ with P&L, the fish are attracted to the vessels by throwing live bait into water. Once on the barbless hook, the SKJ are swung inboard where they fall onto the deck, from where they are immediately put into holds with ice. Larger vessels have up to 18 fishers and smaller ones 10.

Link

 

South Pacific – Solomon Islands, Purse Seiners, Pole and Line, Skipjack and Yellowfin

Fishing area: Western Central Pacific (FAO Area 71)
Fishing method: Pole and Line
Volume – Landings: 27192.3 (2013)

Link

 

Talley’s New Zealand Skipjack Tuna Purse Seine

Fishing area: FAO 81, Southwest Pacific
Fishing Method: Purse Seine
Volume-Landings: Average annually is around 11,000 tons

Link

 

Western Central Pacific – Trimarine, Purse Seiners, Skipjack and Yellowfin

Fishing area: Eastern Central Pacific (FAO Area 77), Western Central Pacific (FAO Area 71)
Fishing method: Purse Seine
Volume – Landings: 43055 (2013)

Link

 


 

Certified Albacore Fisheries

albacore

 

North and South Pacific – AAFA and WFOA, Pole and Line, Albacore

Fishing area: FAO 67 and 77, Eastern Central Pacific
Fishing method: Pole & Line and troll & jig
Volume – Landings: By 2015 5,000 metric tons (combined with AAFA Pacific albacore tuna - south fishery)
Location: Pacific Ocean

FAO69 77

Fishing method:
Trolling for albacore consists of towing artificial lures with barbless hooks, ‘trolls’, behind a fishing vessel at a speed of about 6 knots. If fishers see or feel a tuna on a line they pull it in. Trolling brings fish to the surface and helps to locate schools of albacore. The vessel stops near the school, and fishers keep the school close by throwing small amounts of live fish chum, often anchovy.

In pole-and-line fishing, individual fishers use a stout pole, formerly constructed of bamboo and now made of fiberglass or a high-technology composite, with a short line that has a single barbless hook with either an artificial lure or live bait.

Fishers may use one or both of these methods together for harvesting. Both are notably ‘clean’ fishing methods that catch one fish at a time. The absence of nets in both methods ensures the fishery is ‘dolphin free’.

Link

 

Canada Highly Migratory Species Foundation (CHMSF) British Columbia North Pacific albacore tuna

Fishing area: FAO 67, Northeast Pacific
Fishing method: Troll & jig
Volume – Landings: By 2012 4.000 MT, reported by the certifier

FAO67

Fishing method:
Trolling for albacore consists of towing artificial lures with barbless hooks behind a fishing vessel at a speed of about 6 knots. Individual trolling lines are generally 3 to 20 fathoms long and often constructed from 1/8" braided nylon line, with a 1-6 fathom leader made from150-400 pound test nylon monofilament, to which is attached an artificial feathered jig with a barbless double hook.

Fish are caught one at a time on the trolling line and, upon striking the jig, are retrieved immediately with a hydraulic gurdy or line-puller, or by hand pulling. Usually about 8-14 lines may be trolled by an albacore fishing vessel, however, typically not all lines are pulled during heavy fishing activity. Trolling vessels will customarily operate with a captain and one or sometimes two crew.

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Fiji albacore tuna long line

Fishing area: FAO 71, 77 and 81, South Pacific
Fishing method: Pelagic Long line
Volume – Landings: By 2012 3.470 MT reported by the certifier
Location: The fishery is located in the South Pacific Ocean within the Fiji EEZ (pelagic waters)

FAO71 77 81

Fishing method:
The longline fishing method involves the setting of a main line from a large reel. As this main line is deployed, baited hooks on branch lines are attached at regular intervals. Also at regular intervals, floats and float lines are attached. These suspend the main line in the water column at a predetermined depth. The deepest hooks of each section between floats are set at around 300-400m to target albacore tuna.

In recent years, majority of the longline vessels operating out of Fiji are above 21 m. Trip lengths for these vessels are usually 20 days. The smaller vessels (<20m) operate inside Fiji archipelagic waters with average trip lengths of 9 days.

Link

 

North Atlantic albacore artisanal fishery

Fishing area: Northeast Atlantic (FAO Area 27)
Fishing method: Pole and Line
Volume – Landings: 4300 (2016)

FAO51 57

Link

 

West Coasts of the North and South Islands of New Zealand albacore tuna troll

Fishing area: FAO 81, Pacific Southwest
Fishing method: Troll
Volume – Landings: By 2012 1.832 MT, reported by the certifier
Location: The fishery is located within the Nez Zealand EEZ

FAO81

Fishing method:
Trolling refers to the towing of artificial lures or natural baits near the surface from a moving boat. Commercial albacore trollers in New Zealand tow 12-18 lines simultaneously from the vessel's stern and from long outrigger poles mounted amidships. The line lengths or depths are adjusted to permit hauling of any one line without tangling or interfering with the others. The lines are either braided polypropylene, dacron or monofilament nylon and are hauled in by hand or by hydraulic haulers.

Link

 

South Pacific – SZLC, CSFC, FZLC Cook Islands EEZ South Pacific Albacore And Yellowfin Longline

Fishing area: FAO 81, Pacific Southwest
Fishing method: Pelagic longline
Volume – Landings: By June 2015 1643 tons greenweight catch
Location: Cook Islands Exclusive Economic Zone (excluding the internal waters and territorial sea of the Cook Islands

FAO81

Link

 

Walker Seafood Australia albacore

Fishing area:  FAO statistical area 81
Fishing method:  Pelagic mid-set longline
Volume – Landings:  Total TAC (Total Allowable Catch) established for the fishery in 2013: Albacore 2,500 tons, Yellowfin 2,200 tons
Location: Western and Central Pacific Ocean

FAO51 57

Link

 


 

Certified Yellowfin Fisheries

yellowfin

 

Indian Ocean – Maldives, Pole and Line, Skipjack

Fishing area: FAO 51
Fishing method: Pole and line
Volume – Landings: As of 2007, skipjack tuna via pole and line 95,807 M/T and skipjack tuna via handline 1,054 M/T
Location: The fisheries are confined to the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the Maldives, in the Western Indian Ocean

FAO77

Fishing method:
The basic pole & line fishing technique remains unchanged; although fibreglass poles have replaced bamboo ones and “Japanese” hooks are used.

Tuna are attracted to the fishing vessels by throwing live bait into the water. Once on the barbless hook, the tuna are swung on board where they fall onto the deck, from where they are immediately put into holds with ice. Larger vessels have up to 18 fishers and smaller ones 10.

Link

 

PNA Countries (Parties to the Nauru Agreement)

Fishing area: FAO 71, Western Central Pacific
Fishing method: Purse seiner unassociated/non-FAD free schools
Location: The fishery is located within the EEZ’s of the 8 PNA countries: Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Palau, Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Kiribati and Tuvalu

FAO77

Fishing method:
This fishing method targets adult yellowfin schools (free-schools/unassociated), as well as skipjack in the same fishery which also has MSC certification. A purse seiner circles the school with a deep curtain of netting, Then the bottom of the net is pursed (closed) underneath the fish school by hauling a wire running from the vessel through rings along the bottom of the net and then back to the vessel, preventing the fish from "sounding", or swimming down to escape the net.

Searching for the fish schools and assessing their size and direction of movement is an important part of the fishing operation. Sophisticated electronics, such as echo sounders, sonar, and track plotters, may be used to search for and track schools, assessing their size and movement and keeping in touch with the school while it is surrounded with the seine net.

Link

 

Walker Seafood Australia Yellowfin

Fishing area:  FAO statistical area 81
Fishing method:  Pelagic mid-set longline
Volume – Landings:  Total TAC (Total Allowable Catch) established for the fishery in 2013: Albacore 2,500 tons, Yellowfin 2,200 tons
Location: Western and Central Pacific Ocean

FAO31

Link

 


  

MSC Tuna Fisheries In Full Assessment

 

Today the MSC – Marine Stewardship Council – wild seafood sustainability certification and ecolabel are the most commonly used and highest valued within the tuna industry in regard to determine if the tuna marketed is caught in a sustainable way.

Full assessment of a fishery is the detailed, public, rigorous process that a certifier will follow to see whether the fishery meets the MSC standard. It starts when the fishery client signs a contract with a certifier and the certifier notifies the MSC that the fishery is entering full assessment.

Every fishery that has announced full assessment is listed here further below and the latest details can be found on the MSC website.

Full assessments are carried out by independent certifiers, not by the MSC. Usually, first a confidential pre-assessment takes place to determine the feasibility and success rate of a future full assessment; the outcome is only reported to the applicant. At key stages in the full assessment process for each fishery, the certifier invites public comment. If you would like to contribute to the assessment of any of these fisheries please contact the relevant certifier. Your input helps to ensure well-informed, robust assessments.

7 steps to MSC certification

Step 1: Fishery announcement and assessment team formation

Step 2: Building the assessment tree

Step 3: Information gathering, stakeholder meetings and scoring

Step 4: Client and peer review

Step 5: Public review of the draft assessment report

Step 6: Final report and determination

Step 7: Public certification report and certificate issue

Scores and conditions

In order to obtain the MSC certification, the fishery needs to obtain a score of 60 or more for each performance indicator. If a fishery achieves a score of less than 60 on any performance indicator, certification will not be awarded. Additionally, the fishery must have an aggregated score of 80 or more for each of the three MSC principles - set out in the MSC environmental standard for sustainable fishing - in order to be certified.

Where a fishery achieves a score for any performance indicator of less than 80, but at least 60, the certifier will set one or more conditions for continuing certification. In the absence of exceptional circumstances, the condition(s) shall improve performance of the fishery to at least the 80 level within a period set by the certifier, but not longer than the term of the certification.

The certifier will specify an appropriate timescale for addressing each condition and should specify the outcome or targets for which you should aim. The certifier’s role is to offer guidance and make the required outcome clear to the fishery client.

 


 

Skipjack Fisheries In Full Assessment

skipjack  

 

Echebastar Indian Ocean Purse Seine And Skipjack Tuna

Fishing area: FAO 57, Eastern Indian Ocean, FAO 51, Western Indian Ocean
Fishing Method: Purse Seine
Volume-Landings: In 2015 was 15,263 M/T

Link

 

Northeastern Tropical Pacific purse seine skipjack

Fishing area: Northeastern and Central Pacific Ocean FAO 77

FAO51 57

Fishing method: Purse seine set nets
Commercial markets: Pacific Alliance for Sustainable Tuna (PAST) represents a number of companies which are vertically integrated in their harvesting, processing and marketing operations and which supply domestic and foreign markets.
The assessment process is expected to be complete: by February 2016

Link

 

PT Citraraja Ampat, Sorong pole and line Skipjack and Yellowfin Tuna

Fishing area: FAO 71, Western Central Pacific
Fishing Method: Pole and Line
Volume – Landings: in 2016 was 3,189 M/T
The assessment process is expected to be completed by April 2018.

Link

 

South Pacific – Solomon Islands, Purse Seiners, Pole and Line, Skipjack and Yellowfin

Fishing method: Purse seine and pole & line
Commercial markets: Main commercial market is processors of frozen cooked tuna loins and canned tuna. Main target processing base is Noro, Solomon Islands. Secondary processors are located in Thailand. Final products will be sold primarily into the European Union.
The assessment process is expected to be complete: May 2016

Link

 

Western and Central Pacific – Trimarine, Purse Seiners, Skipjack and Yellowfin

Fishing method: Purse seine - sets unassociated with fish aggregating devices (FADs; WCPFC definition)
Commercial markets: Main commercial market is processors of finished goods (e.g. canneries). Main target processing base is American Samoa. Secondary processors are located in Thailand, Ecuador, and Peru. Final products will be sold primarily in North American markets, with potential sales into the European Union.
The assessment process is expected to be complete: February 2016

Link

 

WPSTA Western and Central Pacific skipjack and yellowfin free school purse seine

Fishing area: FAO 77, Eastern Central Pacific, FAO 71 Western Central Pacific
Fishing method: Purse Seine
The assessment process is expected to be completed by January 2018

Link

 


 

Albacore Fisheries In Full Assessment

albacore

 

French Polynesia albacore and yellowfin longline fishery

Fishing Area: FAO 71, Western Central Pacific
Fishing Method: Longlines
The assessment process is expected to be completed by November 2017

Link

 

North Pacific – Japanese, Pole and Line, Skipjack and Albacore

Fishing method: Pole and Line
Commercial markets: Japanese home market
The assessment process is expected to be complete: May 2016

Link

 


 

Yellowfin Fisheries In Full Assessment

yellowfin

 

Maldives pole & line and handline

Fishing area: FAO 51, Indian Ocean

 FAO51

Fishing method: Pole and Line
Commercial markets: Tuna can market, mainly to Europe
The assessment process was expected to be complete: by 2013

Link

 

Northeastern Tropical Pacific purse seine yellowfin

Fishing area: Northeastern and Central Pacific Ocean FAO 77

FAO31

Fishing method: Purse seine set nets
Commercial markets: Pacific Alliance for Sustainable Tuna (PAST) represents a number of companies which are vertically integrated in their harvesting, processing and marketing operations and which supply domestic and foreign markets.
The assessment process is expected to be complete: by February 2016

Link

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